Pensacola

7 Ways Memory Care Teams Accommodate Personal Care

Memory Care Teams Accommodate Personal Care

By the time a loved one reaches the middle to late stages of dementia, many families are starting to consider their options for professional, full-time care in a community setting. Often, the challenges that accompany late-stage memory loss are difficult for a family member to care for on his or her own. Memory care communities offer an ideal solution for providing specialized personal care for loved ones with dementia, as well as peace of mind for families.

Celebrating National Senior Independence Month

National Senior Independence Month

In honor of National Senior Independence Month, we’re taking the opportunity to share ideas about independence in the face of dementia’s challenges. Often, caregivers and families see dementia as something that takes away independence from their loved one. While this may be the case in some respect, especially in the later stages of the disease, it is possible to encourage freedom, agency and independence even in the midst of challenging symptoms.

How to Talk to Children About Dementia

Talking to Children about Dementia

When a person is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia, life changes not just for the person, but for the whole family as well. While adults have the capability to learn more about the disease and cope with its realities, young children may need help to comprehend the changes that may occur for their loved one and even for themselves. If you have children or grandchildren affected by the challenges of memory loss, you can become a great source of education and support.

8 Tips for Addressing the Alzheimer’s Stigma

Addressing Alzheimer's Stigma

For those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia, one of the most difficult struggles of coping with the disease exists outside the brain. Unfortunately, a great deal of stigma still exists surrounding memory loss, mainly due to the fact that many people don’t understand what exactly Alzheimer’s is. Many misunderstand the disease as minor forgetfulness, without realizing the intensity of cognitive change that takes place. Others may view dementia as a sudden loss of all abilities from thinking to speech and self-care.

Winter & Dementia: Keeping Your Loved One Safe All Season Long

How Digital Technology Improves Dementia Care

How Digital Technology Improves Dementia Care

In today’s world, digital technology seems to impact every aspect of our lives. From the way we communicate to how we enjoy entertainment, technology plays a part. Its impact on senior care is no different. Thanks to innovative computer programs and new technology, caring for seniors with dementia can be more streamlined, effective and beneficial to both seniors and their caregivers.

Planning Meals for Loved Ones with Alzheimer’s: Tips for Success

Planning Meals for Those With Alzheimer's Disease

When a loved one is living with the challenges of memory loss, daily activities that we often take for granted can become difficult to manage. As Alzheimer’s disease (and other forms of dementia) progresses, a person eventually loses the abilities to cook or prepare a meal, choose healthy foods to eat, use utensils and, in some late-stage cases, chew or swallow without difficulty. As a person’s skills and cognitive abilities gradually worsen, it often falls on their caregiver to make sure they eat properly and get enough nutrients in their diet.

How to Celebrate National Family Caregiver’s Month

National Caregiver's Month

For the majority of the five million people living with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, their care is provided by a member of their family. Family caregivers are unpaid and typically have little formal training in dementia care; yet, they ensure the safety and well-being of many seniors in need. If you or someone you know is caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease, it’s time to celebrate your hard work this November during National Family Caregiver’s Month.

The Importance of Intervention for Dementia Patients: Loved Ones in Need of Physical Therapy

If you’re caring for a loved one with dementia, then you know that you are their strongest advocate. Sometimes, you have to be their voice when they have trouble communicating. When they cannot take care of themselves, you give them the support they need to stay healthy. If your loved one ever needs medical intervention due to an injury or illness, it’s up to you to make sure they are cared for in a way that meets their specific needs.

Managing Prescription Medications for a Loved One with Dementia

Adults over the age of 65 use more prescription and over-the-counter medications than any other age group. Chronic illnesses, more frequent injuries, weaker immune systems and other physical conditions all contribute to high levels of medication use in seniors. While it’s beneficial to live in an age of medical advancements, medication use can cause serious problems if not handled safely. The risk for misuse increases when a senior is living with a memory impairment like dementia.

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