News

Planning for Future Care Needs Part 2: Estate Plans

Estate Planning for Seniors

As you near your retirement years, it’s a good idea to start considering your estate planning options. For many of us, the legacy we leave to our spouse, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren matters enormously, so it’s important that your estate plans ensure your surviving loved ones receive the most out of their inheritance. One of the best ways to do that is to avoid the time and costs involved in probate court.

Probate is the traditional legal proceedings that occur after a person dies. The process includes everything from validating the deceased person’s will to appraising their property, paying debts and taxes and distributing their property to beneficiaries. According to Lonette Bentley, Executive Director at Clarity Pointe™ Pensacola, a memory care community in Pensacola, Florida, probate court can cost families a great deal of money and...

Planning for Future Care Needs Part 1: Trusts

As we get older, it’s wise to start planning financially for future care needs, not only for ourselves, but for our loved ones as well. No matter how healthy we may be, most of us want the security of knowing, should anything happen to us, our family will be taken care of. Financial or estate planning helps you prepare your assets for safe, legal transfer to those you designate as beneficiaries. Trusts are a common way to ensure your family receives the inheritance you leave behind.

In basic terms, a trust is a legal, written agreement that designates someone to manage your property and gives instructions for what to do with it after your death. Living trusts are established during your lifetime to protect your assets until you pass them on. Lonette Bentley, Executive Director at Clarity Pointe™ Pensacola, a memory care community in Pensacola, Florida, says, “...

Understanding Different Forms of Dementia

Understanding Different Forms of Dementia

When we talk about dementia, we often assume that it’s synonymous with Alzheimer’s disease. While the terms are often used this way, there are actually many different kinds of dementia. While most types manifest with some degree of memory loss and decreased cognitive function, they differ by specific symptoms, causes and available treatments.

“It’s true that Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, and therefore the most well known,” says Lonette Bentley, Executive Director at Clarity Pointe™ Pensacola, a memory care assisted living community in Pensacola, Florida. “Yet many senior adults suffer from lesser known forms of memory loss that can go undiagnosed and untreated. The more we know about the various forms of dementia, the better we can recognize the disease when it appears and provide the proper care for the individual and their family.”

Know the...

Honoring Choices: Helping with Everyday Challenges for Your Loved One with Memory Loss

Honoring Choices: Helping with Everyday Challenges for Your Loved One with Memory Loss

If you’ve been caring for a loved one with memory loss, you’ve likely heard how important it can be to establish a daily routine. Routines can be helpful for those with diminishing cognitive abilities as they provide structure for the day and allow for natural cuing of what happens next. However, routines can become harmful if they begin to take away your loved one’s freedom of choice.

“When the caregiver’s desire for a set routine becomes a higher priority than the person’s choice and sense of control, we have trouble,” says Lonette Bentley, Executive Director at Clarity Pointe™ Pensacola, a memory care assisted living community in Pensacola, Florida. “Creating some routine structure is a good thing, but even caregivers with the best intentions can occasionally prioritize the routine over their loved one’s desires. Even in situations where a task must be done now, it’s important for caregivers...

Guardianship & Elder Law Considerations for Loved Ones with Memory Loss

Guardianship & Elder Law Considerations for Loved Ones with Memory Loss

If you’re caring for a loved one who’s living with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of memory loss, certain legal considerations could be necessary to ensure your loved one’s health, safety and well-being. Creating a living will and naming a power of attorney can help families ensure their loved one’s wishes are honored in a care setting during the later stages of memory loss. 

Lonette Bentley, Executive Director at Clarity Pointe™ Pensacola, a memory care assisted living community in Pensacola, Florida, helps families understand their loved one’s legal options when faced with progressive memory loss. “It’s not something we like to think about,” says Bentley. “Elder law and end-of-life planning is a reminder of their loved one’s life-altering disease. But it’s important for families and their loved one to realize that there are legal tools out there to make painful and difficult situations...

Pages