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The Association Between Hearing Loss & Alzheimer’s Disease

The Association Between Hearing Loss & Alzheimer’s Disease

As research on dementia and Alzheimer’s disease has advanced, we have discovered several risk factors that we know can increase a person’s chances of dementia. These include genetics, age, brain injuries and diminish cognitive stimulation, just to name a few. Now, scientists believe there is another risk factor to consider. According to recent studies, loss of hearing may be linked to dementia and indicate a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Rob Low, Community Relations Director at Clarity Pointe™ Pensacola, a memory care assisted living community in Pensacola, Florida, says, “Although conclusive evidence has yet to fully explain the link between hearing loss and dementia, the insight these studies have brought to the table reveal interesting warning signs for those with poor hearing. If further studies prove a direct relationship between a loss of hearing and Alzheimer’s, we...

Effective Ways to Tackle Bath Time Routines and Dementia

Effective Ways to Tackle Bath Time Routines and Dementia

For seniors in the middle to late stages of dementia, what was once a pleasant routine for bathing and self-care can turn into a frustrating chore or, at its worst, uncomfortable, embarrassing torment. As dementia progresses and the ability to complete daily tasks diminishes, something as simple as bathing can become extremely difficult and unpleasant. If the loved one you’re caring for becomes resistant to bathing, you’ll need a plan to tackle bath time challenges in a way that’s safe for both of you.

Bathing can be one of the hardest tasks for dementia caregivers,” says Rob Low, Community Relations Director at Clarity Pointe™ Pensacola, a memory care assisted living community in Pensacola, Florida. “It often makes love ones feel embarrassed and vulnerable, angry and stubborn. And caregivers may feel equally as embarrassed if they’re caring for a parent or sibling. For bathing routines to be effective,...

What Dementia Does to the Brain

Dementia is a complex neurological condition. Although dementia and all its forms are not yet fully understood by medical research, it’s important for those dealing with the disease and caring for loved ones with dementia to learn as much as they can about what’s going on in their loved one’s brain. Knowing how the brain works and how the disease affects its functions can give caregivers valuable insight into their loved one’s condition and ultimately learn how to support them as best they can.

Jimmie Fay Griffin, Executive Director at Clarity Pointe™ Tallahassee, a memory care community in Tallahassee, Florida, understands the importance of learning about a loved one’s condition. “Dementia involves much more than memory loss alone,” says Griffin. “This disease brings with it a progression of challenging symptoms, including behavior challenges and personality changes, sleep issues and...

What Couples Need to Know About Dementia and Communication

What Couples Need to Know About Dementia and Communication

Effective communication is essential to healthy, long-term relationships. When we aren’t able to express our thoughts and share our concerns with those we love, we often feel disconnected from the affection and support we receive through conversation. For those caring for a spouse or partner with dementia, struggling to communicate well has the potential to eat away at the relationship and make caregiving more difficult.

Rob Low, Community Relations Director at Clarity Pointe™ Pensacola, a memory care assisted living community in Pensacola, Florida, says, “As dementia progresses, it can affect a person’s ability to think clearly, find the right words and follow along in a conversation. For many affected by the disease, they begin to communicate in more nonverbal ways, such as through their behavior or attitude. They may withdraw from conversations due to frustration....

Top Tips for Caregivers of Newly Diagnosed Parkinson’s Patients

Top Tips for Caregivers of Newly Diagnosed Parkinson’s Patients

If your loved one has recently received a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, you may be wondering where to turn, how to cope and what you need to do to become a good caregiver. In honor of National Parkinson’s Awareness Month, the team at Clarity Pointe™ Pensacola would like to let you know that you’re not alone, and we’re here to help.

“The weeks and months right after a loved one’s diagnosis of a progressive disease can be a time of questions and overwhelming concern,” shares Rob Low, Community Relations Director at Clarity Pointe™ Pensacola, a memory care assisted living community in Pensacola, Florida. “A difficult diagnosis of a disease like Parkinson’s can leave loved ones bewildered and at a loss for what to do first.

“To start to accept your loved one’s diagnosis and begin your caregiving journey, we suggest a combination...

10 Mindfulness Strategies for Dealing With Caregiver Stress

Caregiver Enjoying Morning Coffee in Solitude

For busy caregivers, stress can build up over time and affect our daily lives. Caregiving tasks, family responsibilities, chores and more can take up so much time that many of us forget to take care of ourselves. To practice self-care and cope with the stress involved with caring for someone with memory loss, caregivers need to take a step back, reassess, and learn how to be mindful of their own limits and needs.

Mindfulness is a popular buzzword in today’s culture, often associated with thoughts of meditation or holistic health. And while meditation is certainly one way to practice mindfulness, its applications go far beyond sitting cross-legged or focusing on your body’s energy. In fact, mindfulness is not so much what we do as how we live.

Jimmie Fay Griffin, Executive Director of Clarity...

Understanding Frontotemporal Dementia, or Pick’s Disease

Son Sitting with Senior Father

Dementia is a general term for cognitive decline or memory loss caused by changes in the brain. Within the category of dementia, there are many different types with various causes and symptoms. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is one such type. As described by its name, FTD affects the brain’s frontal and temporal lobes, those near the front of the brain behind the forehead and the areas behind the ears. This type of dementia is also known as Pick’s disease, named for the doctor who first observed its symptoms.

Frontotemporal dementia comes with its own specific symptoms and challenges. Rob Low, Community Relations Director at Clarity Pointe™ Pensacola, a memory care assisted living community in Pensacola, Florida, says, “Each type of dementia offers a specific range of...

7 Ways Memory Care Teams Accommodate Personal Care

Memory Care Teams Accommodate Personal Care

By the time a loved one reaches the middle to late stages of dementia, many families are starting to consider their options for professional, full-time care in a community setting. Often, the challenges that accompany late-stage memory loss are difficult for a family member to care for on his or her own. Memory care communities offer an ideal solution for providing specialized personal care for loved ones with dementia, as well as peace of mind for families.

“As Alzheimer’s disease and dementia become more prevalent for our older generations, it’s our responsibility to create solutions for providing optimal care and support,” says Rob Low, Community Relations Director at Clarity Pointe™ Pensacola, a memory care assisted living community in Pensacola, Florida. “Clarity Pointe designs free-standing memory care communities for the sole purpose of providing those with dementia the...

7 Ways to Cope with a Parent’s Diagnosis of Dementia

It’s never easy to watch our parents get older and lose the capabilities to do certain tasks independently. It’s even harder for those whose parents have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. Not only does this diagnosis guarantee a parent’s eventual loss of skills and independence, but it could also mean a loss of personality traits and characteristics of the person who raised them.

“Adult children of those diagnosed with dementia must learn to cope with many major changes in their loved one,” says Jimmie Fay Griffin, Executive Director of Clarity Pointe™ Tallahassee, a memory care assisted living community in Tallahassee, Florida. “For many, a dementia diagnosis means they’ll become a caregiver to their parent. Their parent may move in with them or require a routine that completely changes a child’s lifestyle. Those who don’t become full-time...

Top Medical Conditions That Mimic Dementia Symptoms

As we care for our parents and the generation of older adults, it’s important to recognize the signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. However, it’s just as vital to know what else could show similar symptoms to memory loss. Older adults are more susceptible to medical conditions and illnesses that can cause dementia-like symptoms. Surprisingly, some of these conditions are quite common.

Rob Low, Community Relations Director at Clarity Pointe™ Pensacola, a memory care assisted living community in Pensacola, Florida, says, “Many health conditions may act like the cognitive difficulties associated with dementia. Discerning individuals or their caretakers may easily mistake symptoms of another condition for the onset of dementia. However, only until a doctor has done an examination can you be certain of the symptoms’ cause.”

Dementia-Like Symptoms...

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